Whither PowerShell?

A couple of years ago there was a great surge of interest about PowerShell. Books, blogs, articles, videos, you name it– PowerShell was the rage. There was some talk in the Take Command forums that it would overwhelm Take Command and TCC (and all the Linux shells) and become the King of Command Processors. That didn’t happen.

I had my doubts at the time. I thought PowerShell was an admirable solution for .NET programmers, but not everyone in the world was (or wanted to be!) a .NET programmer. PowerShell is also not particularly speedy, and fails to improve notably on the Windows command line UI experience. So after some initial research, I haven’t paid a lot of attention to PowerShell, other than ensuring that it works in Take Command tab windows. The requests for PowerShell integration in Take Command & TCC have ceased, as has the overall hoopla.

So what’s happened to PowerShell — has it lost steam and focus, or just become mainstream (and thereby lost sizzle)? A recent conversation with a Take Command user raised some interesting possibilities. He wanted to know:

1) Could I do a PowerShell plugin for TCC that would allow users to run PowerShell scripts inside TCC? (Yes, actually already done but never distributed because of a lack of general interest.)

2) Could I do a TCC plugin for PowerShell that would provide all of the internal TCC commands, variables, and variable functions to PowerShell? (Yes, not very difficult.)

3) Could I make a PowerShell replacement, like TCC is a replacement for CMD (yes, though rather more difficult).

What do you think? Do you care about PowerShell? Would you switch to PowerShell if it had more of the Take Command / TCC features? Would you switch back from PowerShell if Take Command had more of the PowerShell features?

What’s lacking in PowerShell?

What’s lacking in Take Command?

One comment
  1. We use powershell as our principal automation language, hence it is indispensable. Your characterization of powershell as a tool that has “lost sizzle” is inaccurate. Rather, it is a tool that had to overcome the inertia of a far simpler (and far less potent) predecessor.

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