Create links or junctions on network drive

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#1
TCC 11.00.38 Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]

To copy my file structure I need to create directory junctions and file hard
links on a network drive, both systems WinXP, TCC 11.00.38. Neither the
MKLNK nor the MKLINK command will do it. Is there a "remote procedure call"
operation available to achieve this? I can send a batch file to the remote
system, which its local TCC could execute, but how do I force it to start?
--
Steve
 
#2
On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 12:45:45 -0500, Steve Fábián <> wrote:

|To copy my file structure I need to create directory junctions and file hard
|links on a network drive, both systems WinXP, TCC 11.00.38. Neither the
|MKLNK nor the MKLINK command will do it. Is there a "remote procedure call"
|operation available to achieve this? I can send a batch file to the remote
|system, which its local TCC could execute, but how do I force it to start?

I have a TCC server/client plugin, 4REMOTE. It's rather crude ... uses
mailslots or named pipes (don't remember which) but it does basically work
(without providing feedback)

(On the remote machine)
v:\> server /?
Usage: SERVER [/K(ill)]

(On the local machine)
v:\> remote /?
Usage: REMOTE host command

Interested? I'd have to revisit it and figure out exactly how it works.
--
- Vince
 
#3
vefatica wrote:
| I have a TCC server/client plugin, 4REMOTE. It's rather crude ...
| uses mailslots or named pipes (don't remember which) but it does
| basically work (without providing feedback)
|
| (On the remote machine)
| v:\> server /?
| Usage: SERVER [/K(ill)]
|
| (On the local machine)
| v:\> remote /?
| Usage: REMOTE host command
|
| Interested? I'd have to revisit it and figure out exactly how it
| works.

Seems like just the right tool! Very interested!
--
Steve
 

samintz

Scott Mintz
May 20, 2008
1,203
11
Solon, OH, USA
#4
There is a SysInternals tool called PSEXEC that does that as well.

You can also use it to run applications locally using different user
permissions as well as running using SYSTEM permissions. That's actually
pretty cool when running RegEdit as you have access to the SAM settings.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx

This is a description from the web page:

Utilities like Telnet and remote control programs like Symantec's PC
Anywhere let you execute programs on remote systems, but they can be a
pain to set up and require that you install client software on the remote
systems that you wish to access. PsExec is a light-weight
telnet-replacement that lets you execute processes on other systems,
complete with full interactivity for console applications, without having
to manually install client software. PsExec's most powerful uses include
launching interactive command-prompts on remote systems and
remote-enabling tools like IpConfig that otherwise do not have the ability
to show information about remote systems.

-Scott

Steve F$BaC(Bi$BaO(B <> wrote on 01/25/2010 02:00:27 PM:


> vefatica wrote:
> | I have a TCC server/client plugin, 4REMOTE. It's rather crude ...
> | uses mailslots or named pipes (don't remember which) but it does
> | basically work (without providing feedback)
> |
> | (On the remote machine)
> | v:\> server /?
> | Usage: SERVER [/K(ill)]
> |
> | (On the local machine)
> | v:\> remote /?
> | Usage: REMOTE host command
> |
> | Interested? I'd have to revisit it and figure out exactly how it
> | works.
>
> Seems like just the right tool! Very interested!
> --
> Steve
>
>
>
>
 
#5
On Mon, 25 Jan 2010 14:00:29 -0500, Steve Fábián <> wrote:

|| (On the remote machine)
|| v:\> server /?
|| Usage: SERVER [/K(ill)]
||
|| (On the local machine)
|| v:\> remote /?
|| Usage: REMOTE host command
||
|| Interested? I'd have to revisit it and figure out exactly how it
|| works.
|
|Seems like just the right tool! Very interested!

I doubt it's "just the right tool" for anything. It's very crude. It uses a
mailslot, so there's absolutely no server-to-client feedback and there's no
security built-in. Here's a simple (actual) example.

On lucky (remote machine):

v:\> server
v:\>

On the local machine:

v:\> remote lucky echo %%_time & echo %_?
0
v:\> remote lucky echi foo & echo %_?
0

Seen on the remote machine:

v:\> Remote command: echo %_time

21:12:33
Remote command: echi foo

TCC: Unknown command "echi"

****

ftp://lucky.syr.edu/4plugins/4remote.dll

--
- Vince
 
Nov 2, 2008
177
0
#6
Junctions, at least from my experiments, are maintained in the style of a hard link pointing to d:\path. When you change to an OS that maps the drives differently, then d:\path is interpreted in the new OS's enviromnent.

Creating a junction on a network drive that points to a different computer, eg at n:\mylinks, a junction that points to c:\windows, will fail if that directory does not exist on the new computer (eg windows installed on q:\fenster).