Creating Files in Windows 7

Jun 2, 2008
284
1
Newton, MA
#1
I just got a new computer that runs Windows 7, and I've encountered a
problem related to its security features.

If I use the Windows file manager, I can create, for example, a
"plugins" subdirectory under the TCMD11 directory. When I do it, a
windows pops open asking for confirmation, and once I confirm the
operation, the directory is created. The same thing applies when copying
files.

If I try to do the same thing in TCC, the operations are forbidden, even
though I am in administrator mode. How does one overcome this problem?

-- Jay
 

samintz

Scott Mintz
May 20, 2008
1,294
11
Solon, OH, USA
#2
You have 2 options.

1) Install in a directory that is not in "Program Files." I currently
install in C:\TC11.
2) Run TCMD in Administrator mode. You can set the option to do that
always on the Compatibility tab in Explorer's property dialog for the
executable..

Personally, option1 works better for me. I also store my INI file in the
same directory.

-Scott

Jay Sage <> wrote on 11/11/2009 09:34:52 PM:


> I just got a new computer that runs Windows 7, and I've encountered a
> problem related to its security features.
>
> If I use the Windows file manager, I can create, for example, a
> "plugins" subdirectory under the TCMD11 directory. When I do it, a
> windows pops open asking for confirmation, and once I confirm the
> operation, the directory is created. The same thing applies when copying

> files.
>
> If I try to do the same thing in TCC, the operations are forbidden, even

> though I am in administrator mode. How does one overcome this problem?
>
> -- Jay
>
>
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,588
97
#3
> I just got a new computer that runs Windows 7, and I've encountered a
> problem related to its security features.
>
> If I use the Windows file manager, I can create, for example, a
> "plugins" subdirectory under the TCMD11 directory. When I do it, a
> windows pops open asking for confirmation, and once I confirm the
> operation, the directory is created. The same thing applies when
> copying
> files.
>
> If I try to do the same thing in TCC, the operations are forbidden,
> even
> though I am in administrator mode. How does one overcome this problem?
What happens with CMD?

And by "administrator mode", do you mean you asked Windows to start TCMD as
an administrator? (Just logging in as an administrator will not work; this
is a Windows "feature".)

Rex Conn
JP Software
 
#4
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 21:10:38 -0600, rconn <> wrote:

|And by "administrator mode", do you mean you asked Windows to start TCMD as
|an administrator? (Just logging in as an administrator will not work; this
|is a Windows "feature".)

I'm thinking about buying Windows 7 and I have a lot of questions. Perhaps some
of you can shed some light.

Simply, can I make it act just like XP/SP3? (no UAC, no firewall, everything
runs as administrator ... no hassles whatsoever doing **anything** I want?

Can you upgrade from XP/SP3 to Win7? ... recommended? ... my c:\docs&settings
has been relocated to e:\users ... a problem?

Anything alse?

Thanks.

--
- Vince
 
G

gwmacdonald

Guest
#5
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 21:10:38 -0600, rconn <> wrote:

I'm thinking about buying Windows 7 and I have a lot of questions. Perhaps some
of you can shed some light.

Simply, can I make it act just like XP/SP3? (no UAC, no firewall, everything
runs as administrator ... no hassles whatsoever doing **anything** I want?

Can you upgrade from XP/SP3 to Win7? ... recommended? ... my c:\docs&settings
has been relocated to e:\users ... a problem?

Anything alse?

Thanks.

--
- Vince
You can disable UAC and the firewall. However, you can't run with full administrator rights all the time. You have to configure each program to run with administrator rights, where necessary.

You can't upgrade from XP to Win7. You can purchase a Win 7 upgrade edition, because you already own XP, but you'll actually have to do a new installation with your upgrade media.
 
#7
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 21:49:00 -0600, gwmacdonald <> wrote:

|You can disable UAC and the firewall. However, you can't run with full administrator rights all the time. You have to configure each program to run with administrator rights, where necessary.

Can I configure (once and for all time) a program to run with full admin privs?
--
- Vince
 
#8
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 22:07:05 -0600, Charles Dye <> wrote:

|Why, in the name of all that's holy, would you *want* to run without a firewall?

I have never used one. So a better question is why would I want one.

I use IPSEC to block what I want blocked. That's preferable to starting with
everything blocked and having to make exceptions for all the things I want to do
(SMTP server, POP server, NNTP server, mailslots, FTP server, various remote
administration apps, MS Exchange/Outlook over the inet, remote desktop, VPN, and
anything my heart desires to program).
--
- Vince
 
G

gwmacdonald

Guest
#9
Can I configure (once and for all time) a program to run with full admin privs?
--
- Vince
Yes, you can modify the properties of the shortcut or the exectable to run with administrator privileges.

The tcmd.exe file maintains this property when it is overwritten during an upgrade.
 
#10
----- Original Message -----
From: "Charles Dye" <>
To: <[email protected]>
Sent: 2009. November 11., Wednesday 23.06
Subject: RE: [Support-t-1570] Re: Creating Files in Windows 7



> ---Quote (Originally by vefatica)---
> Simply, can I make it act just like XP/SP3? (no UAC, no firewall,
> everything runs as administrator ... no hassles whatsoever doing
> **anything** I want?
> ---End Quote---
> Why, in the name of all that's holy, would you *want* to run without a
> firewall?
If you have three machines that form a network, with a firewall between your
network and the outside world, you would not want to have a firewall between
the three machines.
--
Steve
 
#11
> And by "administrator mode", do you mean you asked
> Windows to start TCMD as an administrator? (Just
> logging in as an administrator will not work; this is
> a Windows "feature".)

To be honest, I don't even know what all this means! But if I run the
command "echo %_admin" the result is "1". And, as I said, if I use the
Windows file manager, when I try to create subdirectories in the program
files area, an extra alert window pops up and asks me to confirm the
operation, which I do, and then the action takes place. I was able, for
example, to create the plugins directory and populate it with the DLL
files I want loaded when TCC starts.

I thought that there might be an option with the commands such as MD,
RD, COPY, MOVE, and DELETE to provide the confirmation, or that the same
alert window would open.

I guess what you're suggesting is that the Windows file manager is
opening with different rights than is TCMD/TCC.

*AHA!!!* That was the answer. Upon right-clicking the TCMD11 icon on the
desktop, I noticed the option "Run as administrator". After shutting
down TCMD, selecting that option, and responding to the verification
prompt, TCMD launched, and I was able to create and delete directories
where those actions had been blocked before.

Now, does anyone know how I can get Windows 7 to startup up with TCMD
running in that mode?

-- Jay
 
#12
On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 23:25:12 -0600, Jay Sage <> wrote:

|Now, does anyone know how I can get Windows 7 to startup up with TCMD
|running in that mode?

Can you modify the properties of the executable as gwmacdonald said was
possible?
--
- Vince
 
May 26, 2008
492
3
#14
You can disable UAC and the firewall. However, you can't run with full administrator rights all the time. You have to configure each program to run with administrator rights, where necessary.
This is not true. If you disable UAC and reboot, you can then start a command prompt (for example) without special "admin mode" and create/delete folders/files in normally protected areas like Program Files (assuming you are an administrator). Basically Windows 7 works like XP when you do that.
 
#16
On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:06:30 -0600, Steve Fábián <> wrote:

|Vince wrote:
|| my c:\docs&settings has been relocated to e:\users ... a problem?
|
|How did you do that?

Right after install, I copy it to the new location and use a program I wrote to
change all the strings in the registry.
--
- Vince
 
#17
vefatica wrote:
| On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 07:06:30 -0600, Steve Fbin <> wrote:
|
|| Vince wrote:
||| my c:\docs&settings has been relocated to e:\users ... a problem?
||
|| How did you do that?
|
| Right after install, I copy it to the new location and use a program
| I wrote to change all the strings in the registry.

Ah! Hacking your own system! I suppose one could export the registry to a
text file, edit the file, and reimport it...
--
Steve
 

dim

Dimitry Andric
May 31, 2008
204
1
Netherlands
#18
On 2009-11-12 15:43, Steve Fábián wrote:

> Ah! Hacking your own system!
It's not really 'hacking', just making the system more reasonable. :)
IMHO, one of Windows's biggest faults has always been that the user
profiles are forced (by default) to be on the system disk.

I would much rather have user data and system data separated, so I have
been 'hacking' all my Windows machines like this for years... Since
Windows NT 3.5 to be exact. ;)
 
G

gwmacdonald

Guest
#19
> *AHA!!!* That was the answer. Upon right-clicking the TCMD11 icon on the
desktop, I noticed the option "Run as administrator". After shutting
down TCMD, selecting that option, and responding to the verification
prompt, TCMD launched, and I was able to create and delete directories
where those actions had been blocked before.

Now, does anyone know how I can get Windows 7 to startup up with TCMD
running in that mode?

-- Jay
Right-click the TCMD11 icon, select Properties, go to the Compatibility tab, and enable the Run this program as an administrator property.
 
#20
dim wrote:
| On 2009-11-12 15:43, Steve Fabian wrote:
| ---Quote---
|| Ah! Hacking your own system!
| ---End Quote---
| It's not really 'hacking', just making the system more reasonable. :)

"Hacking" in the good sense of the word, not hijacked to mean "unauthorized,
destructive access".

| IMHO, one of Windows's biggest faults has always been that the user
| profiles are forced (by default) to be on the system disk.
|
| I would much rather have user data and system data separated, so I
| have been 'hacking' all my Windows machines like this for years...

Wholeheartedly agreed! Code and data should always be separated, and if
possible, into at least two orthogonal dichotomies: system v. user and code
v. data, so there would be "user data", "system data", "user code" and
"system code" volumes, preferably on four different media.
--
Steve
 
#21
On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 20:12:39 -0600, Steve Fábián <> wrote:

|Wholeheartedly agreed! Code and data should always be separated, and if
|possible, into at least two orthogonal dichotomies: system v. user and code
|v. data, so there would be "user data", "system data", "user code" and
|"system code" volumes, preferably on four different media.

The idealist in me agrees, but I suspect 90+% of users don't have/couldn't deal
with multiple volumes. But after all this time, I don't know why MS hasn't come
up with a couple simple installation options: put the profiles here ... (e.g.,
e:\Users, and put the applications (i.e., "Program Files") here ... (e.g., d:\).

The reality is that the vast majority of PC users haven't a clue (don't need to)
and don't care what's going on inside the box. From the point of view of MS
(with hundreds of millions of users), simplicity and uniformity have to be near
the top of the list.
--
- Vince
 
Mar 9, 2009
28
0
#22
On Wed, Nov 11, 2009 at 09:10:31PM -0600, rconn wrote:

> What happens with CMD?
>
> And by "administrator mode", do you mean you asked Windows to start TCMD as
> an administrator? (Just logging in as an administrator will not work; this
> is a Windows "feature".)
I'm not sure what you mean by "logging in as an administrator will not
work". In my short experience with Windows 7 I found that logging in as
the local administrator was the only way the command line was tolerable.

There must be better ways of doing it, but I was too impatient to find
it. I enabled the administrator account as shown in:

http://www.suacommunity.com/forum/tm.aspx?m=10345

Is this not a practical solution?
 
#23
> Right-click the TCMD11 icon, select Properties, go to
> the Compatibility tab, and enable the Run this
> program as an administrator property.

Thank you, Gary. That did the trick!

-- Jay
 
#24
On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 20:12:39 -0600, Steve Fábián <> wrote:

But after all this time, I don't know why MS hasn't come
up with a couple simple installation options: put the profiles here ... (e.g.,
e:\Users, and put the applications (i.e., "Program Files") here ... (e.g., d:\).

--
- Vince
They have - in fact they have for a very long time (probably since Windows 2000). If you do an unattended installation, you can specify windows directory, default profile directory and a whole lot of other things. Since this is obviously a very advanced thing to do, the way to do this is equally advanced. There really wouldn't be any point to clutter the default installation interface with it.

Look here for example: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc721929(WS.10).aspx