How to? dir /s unexpected results

rps

Jul 6, 2008
385
4
Would someone please tell me what is happening here:
Code:
C:\JPSoft>*dir /s /b test1* || (echo. & echo there were %_dir_files files displayed and %_dir_errors dir errors)
C:\JPSoft\test1.bak
C:\JPSoft\test1.btm
C:\JPSoft\test1.zip
C:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

there were 4 files displayed and 0 dir errors

C:\JPSoft>*dir /b test1* || (echo. & echo there were %_dir_files files displayed and %_dir_errors dir errors)
test1.bak
test1.btm
test1.zip
I do not understand an errorlevel=2 when using the /s option. This is also true when using pdir.
Code:
C:\JPSoft>*dir /b /s test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel)
C:\JPSoft\test1.bak
C:\JPSoft\test1.btm
C:\JPSoft\test1.zip
C:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

errorlevel === 2

C:\JPSoft>*dir /b test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel)
test1.bak
test1.btm
test1.zip

errorlevel === 0

C:\JPSoft>*pdir /b test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel)
test1.bak
test1.btm
test1.zip

errorlevel === 0

C:\JPSoft>*pdir /b /s test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel)
C:\JPSoft\test1.bak
C:\JPSoft\test1.btm
C:\JPSoft\test1.zip
C:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

errorlevel === 2
 

rps

Jul 6, 2008
385
4
WAD - for compatibility with CMD.
Huh, when I used CMD the results were as expected with errorlevel=0.
I just didn't include the CMD output with the OP.

Code:
c:\JPSoft>ver

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]

c:\JPSoft>dir /b test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel%)
test1.bak
test1.btm
test1.zip

errorlevel === 0

c:\JPSoft>
c:\JPSoft>dir /b /s test1* & (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel%)
c:\JPSoft\test1.bak
c:\JPSoft\test1.btm
c:\JPSoft\test1.zip
c:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

errorlevel === 0

c:\JPSoft>dir /b /s test1* && (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel%)
c:\JPSoft\test1.bak
c:\JPSoft\test1.btm
c:\JPSoft\test1.zip
c:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

errorlevel === 0

c:\JPSoft>dir /b /s test1* || (echo. & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel%)
c:\JPSoft\test1.bak
c:\JPSoft\test1.btm
c:\JPSoft\test1.zip
c:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

c:\JPSoft>
Well, I guess I could just use the internal variable "%_dir_errors" to verify any actual errors.
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,885
97
Your example is not proving what you think it is ...

CMD expands all the variables on the command line, including those following a compound command or command separator, before executing anything. So what you're actually executing is this:

dir /b test* & (echo. & echo errorlevel == 0)

TCC delays expansion of the variables following a command separator or compound command. I doubt that you want me to duplicate CMD's behavior of pre-evaluating the variables!
 
May 20, 2008
9,144
58
Syracuse, NY, USA
CMD returns 0 anyway.
Code:
v:\> ver

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]

v:\> dir /b /a:d
empty
InternetRegistries
mtest
stream
tcsh
words

v:\> dir /s /b ø*
v:\ø.txt

v:\> echo %ERRORLEVEL%
0
 

rps

Jul 6, 2008
385
4
Rex -- Thanks for the CMD clarification.
Replicating that silly behavior would not be helpful. :joyful:

I am still confused about when the DIR internal variable "%_dir_errors " is set to something other than 0.
The following are a few examples I tried.
Code:
C:\JPSoft>ver

TCC  17.00.59 x64   Windows 7 [Version 6.1.7601]


C:\JPSoft>*dir /s /b test1* & echo. & echo there were %_dir_files files displayed and %_dir_errors dir errors & echo errorlevel ===
%errorlevel
C:\JPSoft\test1.bak
C:\JPSoft\test1.btm
C:\JPSoft\test1.zip
C:\JPSoft\TCMD15x64\logs\test1.txt

there were 4 files displayed and 0 dir errors
errorlevel === 2

C:\JPSoft>*dir /b test1* & echo. & echo there were %_dir_files files displayed and %_dir_errors dir errors & echo errorlevel === %e
rrorlevel
test1.bak
test1.btm
test1.zip

there were 3 files displayed and 0 dir errors
errorlevel === 0

C:\JPSoft>*dir /b test8* & echo. & echo there were %_dir_files files displayed and %_dir_errors dir errors & echo errorlevel === %errorlevel
TCC: (Sys) The system cannot find the file specified.
"C:\JPSoft\test8*"

there were 0 files displayed and 0 dir errors
errorlevel === 2
Can someone provide an example of how the "%_dir_errors " variable actually works?
 
May 20, 2008
9,144
58
Syracuse, NY, USA
rps's original post used /S and /B and a wildcard spec that was found in some but not all subdirectories. That's where TCC and CMD differ. Compare:
Code:
v:\> ver

TCC  17.00.59  Windows 7 [Version 6.1.7601]

v:\> dir /s /b v:\ø*
V:\ø.txt

v:\> echo %errorlevel%
2
Code:
v:\> ver

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]

v:\> dir /s /b v:\ø*
v:\ø.txt

v:\> echo %errorlevel%
0
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,885
97
rps's original post used /S and /B and a wildcard spec that was found in some but not all subdirectories. That's where TCC and CMD differ. Compare:
Not reproducible here.

Code:
[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]ver

TCC  17.00.62 x64   Windows 10 [Version 6.4.9879]

[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]dir /s /b zz.new
C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc\zz.new

[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]echo %errorlevel
0
 
May 20, 2008
9,144
58
Syracuse, NY, USA
Not reproducible here.

Code:
[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]ver

TCC  17.00.62 x64   Windows 10 [Version 6.4.9879]

[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]dir /s /b zz.new
C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc\zz.new

[C:\D_Drive\TakeCommand17\tcc]echo %errorlevel
0
That behavior changed in some build after 59.