Filenames with semicolons

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#1
I am working with files that come from a VMS system.
HTML:
Z:\>dir
 Volume in drive Z has no label.
 Volume Serial Number is 58B8-A853
 
 Directory of Z:\
 
05/25/2012  12:25    <DIR>          .
05/25/2012  12:25    <DIR>          ..
05/17/2012  18:30               110 b1751830.053;1
05/17/2012  18:32               110 b1751832.043;1
05/17/2012  18:38               110 b1751838.015;1
05/17/2012  18:39               110 b1751839.010;1
 
>8------------------ SNIP ----------------------8<
 
05/18/2012  17:47           181,045 r1851747.067;1
05/18/2012  17:48           186,392 r1851748.074;1
05/18/2012  17:53           187,569 r1851753.009;1
05/18/2012  17:54           196,608 r1851754.037;1
05/18/2012  17:57           186,647 r1851757.039;1
             757 File(s)    138,743,731 bytes
               2 Dir(s)  26,210,402,304 bytes free
The number following the semicolon is used by the OS to represent the version number of the file.

In CMD, I get the following...
Code:
Z:\>ver
 
Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
 
Z:\>dir /b | wc -l
757
 
Z:\>dir /b "*;1" | wc -l
755
 
Z:\>dir /b "*;2" | wc -l
2
 
Z:\>dir /b "*;3" | wc -l
File Not Found
0
In TCC, I get the following...
Code:
[Z:\]
10:45:41 $ ver
 
TCC  13.04.63   Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
 
[Z:\]
10:45:43 $ dir /b | wc -l
757
 
[Z:\]
10:46:01 $ dir /b "*;1" | wc -l
755
 
[Z:\]
10:46:09 $ dir /b "*;2" | wc -l
2
 
[Z:\]
10:46:12 $ dir /b "*;3" | wc -l
757
 
#3
Remember that the semicolon is the include-list separator. If you want to match a literal semicolon in filenames, put it in square brackets:

Code:
dir /b "*[;]1"
Thanks, although that doesn't explain why it works correctly when files exist that match and not when files are missing.
 
#6
What if you escape the semicolon?
Code:
dir /b "*^;1" | wc -l
Inside quotes, it gives an error.
Code:
[Z:\]
13:36:35 $ dir /b "*^;1" | wc -l
TCC: (Sys) The system cannot find the file specified.
 "Z:\*^;1"
0
Outside quotes, it gives the same results as TCC in post #1 above.
Code:
[Z:\]
13:38:47 $ dir /b *^;3 | wc -l
757