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hex dump?

Aug
16
0
Is there a DOS command that will do a hex dump of a file?

Something like Take Command's LIST /X

for people who don't have Take Command?
 
Is there a DOS command that will do a hex dump of a file? Something like Take Command's LIST /X for people who don't have Take Command?

Not included with Windows. But there's hundreds of free & commercial products out there to do it; just google "Windows hex dump file".

BTW, the (new in v13) VIEW /X option is far superior to LIST /X.
 
Not included with Windows? The DOS command debug is part of the default Windows install at %windir%\system32\debug.exe and it does primitive hex dumps via the "d" (dump) command. I do not know the command to dump an entire file, but I know that debug is scriptable ("debug <infile >outfile"), though there may be limits on filesize.

Interestingly, the version of debug.exe included with Windows 7 (and every version below that) is exactly the same code and file as the version included with MS-DOS 5.0! See http://thestarman.pcministry.com/asm/debug/debug.htm#NT

For an external, free command-line hex dump utility, I use xd, available with source code from http://xd.adoxa.cjb.net
 
Not included with Windows? The DOS command debug is part of the default Windows install at %windir%\system32\debug.exe and it does primitive hex dumps via the "d" (dump) command.

If it is indeed a DOS executable, then it won't be included with x64 Windows. 64-bit Windows no longer supports DOS binaries.

A third TCC option: TYPE /X, which can be used in a pipe -- it reads from stdin and writes to stdout.
 
deleyd, the free TCC/LE available here has the LIST /X command. No Take Command necessary.

Interestingly, the version of debug.exe included with Windows 7...

I don't have a debug.exe in my Windows 7 Pro... :confused:

If it is indeed a DOS executable, then it won't be included with x64 Windows. 64-bit Windows no longer supports DOS binaries.

That may explain it..?
 
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