How Do I Get Rid of 'Everything'

Jun 24, 2017
15
0
#1
Sadly I wasn't paying attention when I applied an update which 'check updates' found and I got lumbered with the Everything bloatware which I'm trying to get rid of.

First, there's no 'Uninstall' option in Control Panel, second while I was able to kill the process and delete Everything*.* in the TCC directory I'm left with EVERYTHING64.DLL which in undeletable, giving an "Access denied" trying to delete it.

I can't find any trace of 'everything' using Regedit so can't see any 'Run' key and since Everything.exe has gone I can't figure why the DLL can't be deleted.

What do I do to get rid of this entirely?

As an aside, when did JPSoft start bundling bloatware with a default 'yes' to install? It's my fault I got lumbered by this but it was a nasty shock from a company I've dealt with for approaching 30 years. :(

[edit]

Don't know why the title is all upper-case I didn't type it that way.
 
Jun 24, 2017
15
0
#2
After poking around the registry I did find one reference to this DLL but it wasn't anything of interest.

When I try to delete it from another tool I get "File is in use by another process" but I can't find out what process that is. What process is now loading this DLL after I got rid of every other 'everything' file in the TCC21 directory?
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,621
97
#3
First, Everything Search is not "bloatware"; it's used by TCC for its internal fuzzy directory searching.

Second, everything64.dll isn't part of Everything Search, it's part of TCC. (It's the interface between TCC and Everything Search.) It can't be removed without removing TCC.

If you don't want fuzzy searching, you can remove Everything Search by uninstalling & reinstalling TCMD.
 
Jun 24, 2017
15
0
#4
Well from their Uninstall page one may, IMHO, be forgiven thinking that it does Web access: https://www.voidtools.com/support/everything/uninstalling_everything/

Knowing nothing about the tool seeing mention of HTTP logs and 'search history' made me suspicious as well as the fact that in spite of that page saying:

"
To completely uninstall Everything with the uninstaller:
  • From the Control panel, open Programs and Features.
"
there is no such entry nor is there an uninstall option from the TCC installer.

Thanks for confirming that I can't delete it without a complete re-install of TCC.
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,621
97
#5
The Everything Search HTTP web server is an optional server (that you run on your own system) that allows you to search for your files from a web browser. However, TCC does not install, configure, or use the HTTP server. So unless you create it yourself, it doesn't exist.

Everything Search is incorporated into the TCC installer & uninstaller; there is no separate Everything installer / uninstaller.
 
May 20, 2008
456
2
#6
I am another one that prefers for Everything to not be installed with TCMD as I never do fuzzy searches across my whole drive. I really, really, really wish that install selection could persist as some of the others do. When I find it has been accidentally installed, I do the following:
  1. run CMD as administrator
  2. sc delete everything (You can sc query everything first to verify install.)
That should remove just the service portion without forcing an uninstall/reinstall of TCMD.
 
May 20, 2008
456
2
#8
Keith,
It may be great if you want that functionality. There are many great programs I don't have a need for. My folders are structured in such a way that I usually can find things without having to search for them. At most, I would use a whole drive search maybe once or twice a year. In fact, I cannot even remember the last time I did that, probably way more than year ago. For something used so infrequently, I just don't see the need to pay the running cost (CPU, RAM, etc.) every single day I use the computer. For me, this is equivalent to voluntarily paying an extra $0.02 per kwh to the electric company. It's not much more, but it would still be paying more for no extra benefit. I just don't see the need to do that.

Edit: Just to be clear, I am in no way suggesting it be removed, just that some of us do not use that particular feature.
 
Aug 15, 2009
13
1
#9
Question for mr. Conn: I use Everything as a standalone application (it's a must-have utility!), i.e. it's always installed in my system as separate product (I use portable version). Should I install Everything as part of Take Command installation too?
 

rconn

Administrator
Staff member
May 14, 2008
10,621
97
#10
Question for mr. Conn: I use Everything as a standalone application (it's a must-have utility!), i.e. it's always installed in my system as separate product (I use portable version). Should I install Everything as part of Take Command installation too?
If you want to use Everything for the Take Command / TCC fuzzy directory searching, then yes. If you don't use fuzzy searching, then it doesn't matter.
 
Likes: DimmY
Aug 16, 2008
124
0
#11
Everything just needs to be running. It doesn't matter if the portable version or the one that comes with TCC. But don't run it simultaneously.
 
Aug 15, 2009
13
1
#12
It would be nice if the installer remembers the previously specified settings and used them when installing each new version.
 
Aug 23, 2010
277
2
#13
I too prefer that such tools are never appear on my system; no matter how "configured" they come in, it always leaves a possibility for a foreigner to exploit the tool to their advantage.
Such tools are on the same level as encoding utilities used by trojan.encoder family of scripts: malicious usage of a purposeful result.
 
Aug 15, 2009
13
1
#14
it always leaves a possibility for a foreigner to exploit the tool to their advantage.
Such tools are on the same level as encoding utilities used by trojan.encoder family of scripts: malicious usage of a purposeful result.
Absolutely disagree with you. I can not imagine my PC without "Everything".
 
Likes: evensenm
#15
I too prefer that such tools are never appear on my system; no matter how "configured" they come in, it always leaves a possibility for a foreigner to exploit the tool to their advantage.
Such tools are on the same level as encoding utilities used by trojan.encoder family of scripts: malicious usage of a purposeful result.
Sounds like someone that wears tin foil on his head. Overly paranoid