How to link a directory from c: to d:

Jul 18, 2009
30
0
#1
I have added an extra data partition to Windows XP
and would like to have an alias from
c:\Documents and Settings\My Documents
to
d:\Documents and Settings\My Documents


Apparently many programs do not accurately place files
in my new d:\Documents and Settings\My Documents
so I would like to have any program trying to put files in
c:\Documents and Settings\My Documents to have them
automatically transfered to d:.

The reason for this is I'm getting a SSD drive for C: and I want to avoid
programs writing to the C:\ drive.

I use this in Linux to transfer programs in /home/bin
to /usr/local/bin by a soft link to /usr/local/bin and it works perfectly
and also protects my bin files from loss in case of problems with the root partition.

Although I used to use 4NT it's been a long time and I could use some help
in the proper syntax.

Any help would be appreciated.

Larry
 
Jun 2, 2008
32
0
#2
The reason for this is I'm getting a SSD drive for C: and I want to avoid programs writing to the C:\ drive.
This is not a solution but more like adding to your problem :-/

You also need to handle the following system environment variables:

APPDATA=C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming
LOCALAPPDATA=C:\Users\username\AppData\Local
TEMP=C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Temp
TMP=C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Temp

and possibly:

USERPROFILE=C:\Users\username

where username is your user name.

Ebbe
 
#3
I could use some help
in the proper syntax
If I was at home I'd be able to give you something more akin to what you're trying to do, because I've just been through the pain of getting Windows 7 to accept the fact that the Users structure should be on the D partition not the C, but from my work laptop the closest I can offer is:

Code:
mklink /j c:\temp d:\temp\
which created a new C:\temp junction pointing to the existing D:\temp\, so I guess something like:

Code:
mklink /j "c:\Documents and Settings\larry\My Documents" "d:\Documents and Settings\larry\My Documents"
would do the trick. I've not found any reason to use a symbolic link rather than a junction in this instance, but if you remove the /j switch then a symbolic link would be created.
 
Jan 19, 2011
581
10
Norman, OK
#4
Right click on your My Documents folder and change the "Target folder location". This will tell XP that you want "My Documents" elsewhere.