@IPADDRESS[] always returns 11001

Apr 2, 2011
1,218
2
51
North Carolina, USA
Code:
[C:\Program Files\JPSoft\TCMD17x64]ver & echo %@ipaddress[jpsoft.com]

TCC  17.00.68 x64   Windows 7 [Version 6.1.7601]
162.159.248.21
 
Jun 2, 2008
284
1
Newton, MA
When I pass a nonexistent domain name (or, perhaps, more exactly, a malformed domain name), the result, after a noticeable delay, is 11001.

TCC(17.00.69): C:\>echo %@ipaddress[jpsoft]
11001

If I enter a properly formed domain name that does not exist (presumably), I get a different result.

TCC(17.00.69): C:\>echo %@ipaddress[jpsoft.comx.zz]
92.242.140.21

But that is the value that NSLOOKUP returns.

TCC(17.00.69): C:\>nslookup jpsoft.comx.zz
Server: Wireless_Broadband_Router.home
Address: 192.168.1.1

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: jpsoft.comx.zz
Address: 92.242.140.21

 
Jun 2, 2008
305
1
If I enter a properly formed domain name that does not exist (presumably), I get a different result.

TCC(17.00.69): C:\>echo %@ipaddress[jpsoft.comx.zz]
92.242.140.21

But that is the value that NSLOOKUP returns.

TCC(17.00.69): C:\>nslookup jpsoft.comx.zz
Server: Wireless_Broadband_Router.home
Address: 192.168.1.1

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: jpsoft.comx.zz
Address: 92.242.140.21
That's unallocated.barefruit.co.uk. Your ISP? I bet your browser goes to an ad.., I mean notification page when it can't resolve a name.
 
Jun 2, 2008
284
1
Newton, MA
If I put that IP address into the browser's URL field results in the following message from Verizon (my service provider is Verizon FiOS):

Sorry, We could not find 92.242.140.21
It may be unavailable or may not exist.​
 
Jun 2, 2008
305
1
Aha. Yup, I just tried that too. And if you used jpsoft.comx.zz, it would say that instead of the IP address.

Interestingly, unallocated.barefruit.co.uk doesn't resolve to anything, not even 92.242.140.21.
 
May 20, 2008
9,351
62
Syracuse, NY, USA
What happens if you put "jpsoft.comx.zz" in your browser's location box?

It wouldn't surprise me if your ISP were doing "DNS Redirection" ... in which DNS returns a "special" IP when you attempt to look up an unknown host. That screws up NSLOOKUP, and if your in a browser, usually results in your being taken to a site that tries to be helpful (mostly with ads).

I had RoadRunner turn off DNS Redirection years ago. But, because of this thread I discovered it was turned on again (no doubt because I bought my own cable modem a while back). It's turned off again after an unnecessary hour on the phone with RoadRunner. It's a simple task (DOCSIS modem setting). Tier 1/2 techs can do it but they didn't know about it (probably typical). The tier 3 tech I finally got knew about it but took 15 minutes figuring out which tool he needed to use to change it.