Launching CMD.EXE from the Explorer Bar

This is a new technique for me, so sharing it with others who also may not know.

So, I have navigated to E:\hb32 in Explorer in Windows 10.

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I next type cmd.exe in the address bar;
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This then launches cmd.exe in the E:\hb32 folder.
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Joe
 
Nov 2, 2008
246
2
I launch tcc from a modified 'write.exe', that uses apppath to load tccu.exe, In turn the apppath launches tcc.exe. This overcomes a number of bugs in Windows.
 
May 20, 2008
12,049
128
Syracuse, NY, USA
You can do the reverse, i.e., launch explorer from TCC, via

*explorer /e,.
Or even easier with START .

I have known about the Explorer location bar for a long time, probably since @Joe Caverly first mentioned it. But never use it; it's a tad cumbersome. If you use the TCCHere mechanism (TCCHere.btm) you can right-click on the name of the current folder in Explorer's left-hand pane and choose "TCC prompt here". Even better (IMHO) if, in HKCR\Directory\Background, you mimick what TCCHere.btm does in HKCR\Directory, then you'll get "TCC prompt here" from a right-click on the background of an Explorer folder window (or a right-click on the desktop itself). That's the one I use quite often.
 

Charles Dye

Super Moderator
Staff member
May 20, 2008
4,641
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Albuquerque, NM
prospero.unm.edu
I tend to do this kind of stuff through the Win-R dialog. TCC.EXE is registered in AppPaths, so typing tcc is enough to launch it.

That little dialog is actually a lot savvier that you might guess. It can expand environment variables; you can run %userprofile% or %temp% to open the desired directory. It even recognizes shell folders, e.g. shell:printersfolder to see your printers.
 
May 20, 2008
12,049
128
Syracuse, NY, USA
I tend to do this kind of stuff through the Win-R dialog. TCC.EXE is registered in AppPaths, so typing tcc is enough to launch it.

That little dialog is actually a lot savvier that you might guess. It can expand environment variables; you can run %userprofile% or %temp% to open the desired directory. It even recognizes shell folders, e.g. shell:printersfolder to see your printers.
Yes, the Run dialog is very easy. But it doesn't give you any sort of "here" mechanism (does it?).
 
Nov 2, 2008
246
2
Spiritpyre's shell extensions can open a lot of useful things, like Toggle fileextentions, toggle hidden, open command prompt, etc. It's a bit long in the tooth, but works well in Windows 7 (6.10 32-bit). You can add things to the menu too.