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national characterset

Discussion in 'Support' started by Jora, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Jora

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    Because i am a user from germany, i have a typical german problem:
    The behaviour of the representation of national characters changed from Tcmd8 to Tcmd9:
    Entering national characters (e.g. a with dots) on the command line in an "Echo" command works correct. Doing the same in a batch file, the characters are displayed incorrect. That was different and correct with TCMD8.
    So i looked into the btm file:
    echo äöüÄÖÜ ( these are aouAOU with dots )
    echo %@char[228]
    in hex:
    6563686F20E4F6FCC4D6DC0D0A
    6563686F202540636861725B3232385D
    the second line echo's the (a with dots) correct to the screeen, while the first echo is incorrect.
    What's wrong ??
     
  2. Steve Fabian

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    Jora wrote:
    | Because i am a user from germany, i have a typical german problem:
    | The behaviour of the representation of national characters changed
    | from Tcmd8 to Tcmd9:
    | Entering national characters (e.g. a with dots) on the command line
    | in an "Echo" command works correct. Doing the same in a batch file,
    | the characters are displayed incorrect. That was different and
    | correct with TCMD8. So i looked into the btm file:
    | echo äöüÄÖÜ ( these are aouAOU with dots )
    | echo %@char[228]
    | in hex:
    | 6563686F20E4F6FCC4D6DC0D0A
    | 6563686F202540636861725B3232385D
    | the second line echo's the (a with dots) correct to the screeen,
    | while the first echo is incorrect.
    | What's wrong ??

    There is a difference between using 4NT8, TCMD8 or TCC9 in its own window,
    and using any of these command processors in a TCMD9 tab. Please specify
    which environment you refer to (stand-alone command processor, or TCMD9
    tab)?
    --
    Steve
     
  3. Jora

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    Sorry, i forgot to mention:
    I'm calling Tcmd9 from Win XP. From the TCC9 window prompt i call the btm file with the echo/screen or scrput statements. All get the problem from the btm and are ok, when you use the commands directly from the prompt.
    I restored the TCMD8 environment and the btm worked well there.
    Jora
     
  4. p.f.moore

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    2008/9/19 Jora <>:

    It sounds like you're experiencing the difference between the GUI and
    console character sets. Take Command 8 was a GUI application, which
    used the Windows character set. Take Command 9 is a GUI application
    which hosts a console application - and TCC is that console
    application. So with v9, you'll find that you are using the console
    character set.

    Sorry that's a bit garbled - I'm in the UK, and this sort of thing
    only hits me when I need the £ sign to talk about money :-) Hopefully,
    it will help point you in the right direction.

    Paul.
     
  5. Jora

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    I think, you're understanding the problem, but it must be in a different area:
    I did the following test on the TCC console window:
    1. i entered 'echo %@char[228]'. the result was the echo of an
    > a with dots<
    2. i entered 'echo [ alt-228 ]'. The result is, that the command line is then 'echo >o with dots <' and the output ist the > o with dots <.
    So the output of the function @char[n] gives a different output than entering the ascii-code manually. Maybe the @char is part of the tcmd9 and uses windows character set and the asciicode is going directly to tcc9.
    How can that difference be solved ?
    I just wanted to code a small 'application' like a menu with national characters and got bored by the display.
    Jora
     
  6. samintz

    samintz Scott Mintz

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    Rex is the expert on Unicode vs ASCII and code pages and fonts and all
    that gobbledegook. Someone pointed out in this thread that there is a
    difference between a pure console session and one running in the TCMD GUI.
    GUI fonts are different than console fonts. Even if you select the same
    font for both, they don't always render the same.

    According to the help docs for @CHAR:
    Not all characters are printable. High ASCII characters (128-255) and
    Unicode characters may vary depending on the font used.

    The Alt-### mechanism creates ASCII chars, not Unicode. The a-umlaut
    character is decimal 132 in the old IBM OEM character set. 228 is capital
    sigma. Windows has a hand in translating some of those characters as
    well.

    -Scott

    Jora <> wrote on 09/19/2008 10:18:14 AM:


    area:

    <.

     
  7. Charles Dye

    Charles Dye Super Moderator
    Staff Member

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    Try Alt-0228 instead of Alt-228.
     

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