Take Command on Windows 11

Sep 11, 2009
34
0
Portland, Or.
I have an older TC & I'm happy with it.. I installed it on my new Windows 11 system and i't sort of works..
One annoyance, Win 11 always asks if I want to allow it to run. Is there a way to stop Win 11 from asking ??

I just created a new userid on this Win11 and every time the new user fires it up, it claims it's in a 30 day evaluation! (it's not, I bought it years ago!).. and I have to plug in a name and key ... EVERY TIME it is started along with the win11 "are you sure" ... WHY? and can I stop that?

Thanks for any clues
P.S. STAY AWAY FROM WINDOWS 11 It's far from finished.. It's a MESS!
 
Sep 11, 2009
34
0
Portland, Or.
Turns out that Win 11 is reminding you that TC is running with ADMIN privledges (does it do that on win 10 also ?)
Is there a way to 'answer' yes on the command that starts TC?

Also, anyone run Power Shell under Take Command? do they step on each others toes, or 'play nice'?
 
Aug 9, 2009
293
1
Hmm UAC's been around since windows 7.
Your older TC version was not designed for win11 keep that in mind.

Completely Disabling UAC's has consequences. Google for more info

Latest versions of TCC and PS do play well together in win10.
 
Dec 26, 2009
35
2
No where
Hmm UAC's been around since windows 7.
Your older TC version was not designed for win11 keep that in mind.

Completely Disabling UAC's has consequences. Google for more info
UAC was first introduced in Windows Vista, circa 2008. And I have been completely turning it off since then, with no terrible consequences.
 
May 20, 2008
11,810
118
Syracuse, NY, USA
UAC was first introduced in Windows Vista, circa 2008. And I have been completely turning it off since then, with no terrible consequences.
I have always left it on with very little inconvenience. You can get an elevated TCC without any UAC prompt using a scheduled task (run TCC, highest privileges, run on demand). I have an AutoHotKey shortcut (Ctrl-Alt-A) that looks like this. The "hide" hides the schtasks.exe console.

Code:
!^a::
Run schtasks /run /tn TCCAdmin,,hide
return

Before AutoHotKey I used schtasksw.exe, a GUI (no console) version of schtasks.exe which I made by altering schtasks.exe with DevStudio's editbin.exe. I do that for RegEdit using a PowerPro toolbar button but it could be done with a shortcut or, I imagine, by a variety of other means.
 
Aug 23, 2010
675
9
Being a systems and network administrator for decades, I've found UAC inconvenient at first, but I reviewed my policies when my account became Domain Administrator.
Since then, I find it more convenient to run with Yes/No UAC prompts rather than run under regular user and having to enter username and password on every prompt. Especially considering overly stupid game updaters that ask for system access permissions where they do not need them for anything useful. (Blizzard, I'm looking at you.)
 
Aug 9, 2009
293
1
UAC was first introduced in Windows Vista, circa 2008. And I have been completely turning it off since then, with no terrible consequences.
I've always been a believer in layered protection. If one layer gets bruteforced then you have another layer for it to deal with. So if you've had no terrible consequences that's the cat's whiskers!
 

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