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TCC in DevStudio's terminal

May
13,035
174
Does anyone use DevStudio? I reckon at least @Charles Dye does.

Recent versions have a built-in "terminal" (CTRL+` or View\Terminal). By default, you get PowerShell but in Tools\Options\Environment\Terminal you can set the default as well as add your own (and make it the default). I did that with TCC. You can put the terminal window wherever you like (stand-alone, pinned to the bottom (it auto-hides), in a document tab) and when you re-open it after closing it, it remembers where it was. Here's my TCC terminal in a document tab.

1666886405016.png


Here it is pinned to the bottom.

1666886503646.png
 
Does anyone use DevStudio? I reckon at least @Charles Dye does.

I actually use an antiquated version of Visual Studio that I got through some forgotten free-Microsoft-educational-giveaways program. It's old, but it does what I need; I've never felt the need to pay for an upgrade.
 
I actually use an antiquated version of Visual Studio that I got through some forgotten free-Microsoft-educational-giveaways program. It's old, but it does what I need; I've never felt the need to pay for an upgrade.
Visual Studio Community is free and it's pretty nice. I have VSC2019. The latest is VSC2022. I often revisit projects created with VS2003 and VS2008 (after they're converted).
 
Visual Studio Community is free and it's pretty nice. I have VSC2019. The latest is VSC2022. I often revisit projects created with VS2003 and VS2008 (after they're converted).

Does the Community version let you create .DLLs? I was under the impression that it didn't. But I could be wrong, or out of date.

(My info, I mean. I know that I'm out of date....)
 
P.S., I was never aware of any educational freebies. VS wasn't available to me through my U. IIRC, I paid $99 for VS2003 and $119 for VS2008 at the bookstore. I still have the CD distributions (but no CD hardware). I wonder if they'd work.
 
Does the Community version let you create .DLLs? I was under the impression that it didn't. But I could be wrong, or out of date.

(My info, I mean. I know that I'm out of date....)
Sure. That's where I work on plugins. I'm not terribly demanding, but VSC doesn't seem handicapped in any way.
 
And the IDE is amazing, at least compared to my old VSs. And it's utterly customizable. There's also something called "VSCode" which I know nothing about.
 
I use Visual Studio Code.

It is basically a source code editor, similar to Notepad++.

Using extensions from the Marketplace, Visual Studio Code can be made to run/compile/debug any code.

Similar to Notepad++.

Here's some of the extensions that I use in Visual Studio Code.

1666903074903.png

Like @vefatica has TCC for his terminal in VS2019, I have TCC for my terminal in VSCode.

1666902742692.png


Here's the Github Page for Visual Studio code.

Joe
 
Not out of the box.

Visual Code has workspaces.

It allows users to open one or more directories, which can then be saved in workspaces for future reuse.

If you search the Marketplace, you will find several Visual Studio Extensions that can open a Visual Studio Code .sln

Or, you can write your own Extension to build projects, the way that you want to build projects.

Visual Code is very customizable.

Joe
 
I just installed VSC2022 side-by-side with VSC2019 (for no other reason than it's 64-bit). It works. I read that when you open a project created with an earlier version you can update it to use the newest tools (whatever that means) and you won't be able to use the old VS (which I later found to be true). So before doing anything I made a copy of my "Projects" directory. I open the copies when in VSC2022 and let them be updated. In both versions, "Recent projects" shows the same list which will fast become a confusing mix of .SLN files in d:\projects2019 and in d:\projects2022. I had also exported IDE settings from VSC2019 and imported them into VSC2022. That seemed to have worked OK. I don't know if you can do that with an ancient version of VS. One thing that didn't get exported/imported was my External Tools. Oh, well!
 
Yes to everything.

You can;
It would be great if you could make available intellisense for TCC in VSCode.

All of the documentation necessary to accomplish these tasks is available on the Documentation for Visual Studio page.

It would be great to be able to debug a .BTM in Visual Studio Code also.

Looking forward to your VSCode Extension.

Joe
 
Hey @vefatica,
I've always start VSCode by pressing the WIN key, and typing VS Code, never from the command line.

However, I get the same results as you when starting from the TCC command line;
Code:
c:\users\jlcav\appdata\local\programs\microsoft vs code>start /pgm "code.exe"

c:\users\jlcav\appdata\local\programs\microsoft vs code>
[main 2022-10-27T23:49:59.025Z] update#ctor - updates are disabled due to running as Admin in user setup
[main 2022-10-27T23:50:02.760Z] Starting extension host with pid 1172 (fork() took 17 ms).
[main 2022-10-27T23:50:37.410Z] Waiting for extension host with pid 1172 to exit.
[main 2022-10-27T23:50:37.440Z] Extension host with pid 1172 exited with code: 0, signal: null.

c:\users\jlcav\appdata\local\programs\microsoft vs code>

Instead of running code.exe, run code.cmd;
Code:
@echo off
setlocal
set VSCODE_DEV=
set ELECTRON_RUN_AS_NODE=1
"%~dp0..\Code.exe" "%~dp0..\resources\app\out\cli.js" --ms-enable-electron-run-as-node %*
endlocal

Joe

ADDED: Run;
Code:
code.cmd --help
for more command line options.
 
Start menu ... "VS Code" gives me nothing. I pinned it to the start menu and clicked on it once. I got

Code:
v:\> tl /f code
Start  Time             Pid       CPU(s)     WS(M)  Name
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10/27  20:16:40.819    9916        1.125      89.1  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:40.978   10432        0.797      90.8  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:41.048    7104        0.078      37.7  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:41.107    6280        4.219     132.7  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:41.909   12228        1.938      87.7  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:41.969    9212        0.422      89.8  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:42.207   10856        0.203      71.6  Code.exe
10/27  20:16:42.579   10268        0.141      72.9  Code.exe
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This product is not for me.
 
Don't start VS Code from terminal with `.exe`. I've reported the behavior and got the answer that it is WAD.
Instead, use one of the wrappers inside the ./bin/ directory.
Though I noticed that they do not quite work as expected, but I've had no chance to report the behavior.

The "not expected" exhibits in that the running VS Code process is holding the terminal open until you close the editor, even if you exit the shell from which it was started.
 
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